Financial Planning: When to Look for a New Job

Jan 13 • Career Planning, Financial Planning • 1030 Views • No Comments on Financial Planning: When to Look for a New Job

To hit your financial goals, you will most likely need to manage your career effectively, unless of course you are waiting for an inheritance that may never come!  One of the challenges that may appear periodically in your career is the question, “Do I need to look for a new job?”  With employment rates ticking slightly upwards and some companies cautiously hiring, it may be a better time to transition.  Signs that may indicate you should start looking:

1)      You have been passed over for promotions a couple times or in a re-organization, you didn’t “win” a position and were demoted.

2)      You don’t see a path at your current company that interests you and will use your strengths.  If you simply don’t see how you can continue to grow and develop your skills, it may be time to leave.

3)      The health of your company or industry remains on life-support despite the improving economy, this too could dampen your personal future.  Do you really want to stay through constant downsizing and budget cuts or do you want to get involved in a firm that is growing?

4)      Consider your age.  If you are in your 20s or early 30s and have held several different jobs, be careful not to make too many jumps without giving your current situation time.  If you are in your 30s or 40s with a steady work record, it may be a great time to move.  I tell clients in their mid-40s that if they have an urge to move at some point, they need to do so before they hit 50.  Employers are much more willing to hire folks in their late 40s because those candidates are likely to work 10-15 more years.

5)      You have lost respect for the leadership of the company.  I hear this frequently from business executives who have decided to look for another job.  If you don’t trust and/or respect the people you are working for and who are making the key decisions for the company, it is likely time to get out.   Unless there is hope for these leaders to be ousted, it is unlikely that your opinion of them will change (and even more unlikely that they will change).  You need to find a company where you respect the leaders.

Evaluate the points above and determine if the time is right to find another job.

For more information, visit our website at www.makinglifecount.com or contact Joni Lindquist – jlindquist@makinglifecount.com, (913) 345-1881.

Photo credit: One Way Stock / Foter.com / CC BY-ND

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